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11/24/2015

How to Work With Different Personalities

Whether it is your peers, management or clients, we can guarantee that everyone you come in contact with is not going to think and work exactly like you do. The most important thing is that you are focused on producing quality work and remaining a respectful professional, but here are some practices for maintaining positive relationships in the workplace.

 

Know your personality type (and theirs)

 

Being self-aware can allow you to change everything about your relationship with those you work with. If you know your personality tendencies and why you choose to act in a certain way, you will be able to understand why certain things bother you more than others. For this same reason, it is important to know the personalities of your colleagues, clients and supervisors. Knowing their personality types will enable you to not to necessarily cater to their every need, but to adjust your interactions in an understanding way. This doesn’t mean changing who you are, but it does mean appreciating that you have a responsibility to be respectful of others.

 

Ask questions about colleague preferences

 

Don’t just ask these questions; make sure you listen to the answers. Always establish yourself as someone with an open line of communication. When people come to you with a concern about how you are working together, you should first seek to understand their view of the situation before you ever consider defending your own position. Finding out things like if your clients or coworkers prefer to communicate via phone or email can make a big difference in your work relationships. Making simple changes that won’t disrupt your productivity can produce better results, so there’s no reason you shouldn’t adjust!

 

Pick your battles

 

Don’t be the worker who cries “big deal!” at every little thing that comes up. If you want changes in things that really matter, you can’t make an issue out of every situation. Respect your co-workers and clients with the benefit of the doubt that they are all doing the best that they can until you are clearly shown differently. By managing your expectations and communicating clearly, you can avoid battle-like situations. Recognize that sometimes working through things isn’t a lot of fun, but that doesn’t mean that it is a negative. Be able to recognize a battle when you see one, and put down your armor if it is just a peace talk.

 

Acknowledge the expertise of others

 

Trust that everyone you work with is there for a reason. Ask for input and act from the realization that you can’t do it all. Celebrate the diversities of your team as opportunities for excellence and growth. When you notice that something has been done well or someone you work with has a unique talent, acknowledge them and let them know you appreciate that their contributions make everyone’s job easier.

 

Relationships equal results

 

Building professional relationships among your colleagues and clients is not an optional aspect of work. It is vital. Reaching out in respect, kindness and encouragement can make all the difference in a work place environment. These relationships will inspire loyalty and increase productivity. Having a relationship in place can minimize roadblocks to just a bump in the road.

 

Diverse personalities and synergizing what they bring to the table can be a wonderful thing. However, differences can also destroy a good business if there is not respect and trust in place. Learn more about your personality, personalities of others and how to make them work through Surgent’s webinar Adapting Different Personality Styles and be on your way to becoming a better employee, leader and potential manager. Sign up today! 


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